Roy J SMITH 

 

michel armin
ARMY SERIAL NUMBER36505028
AGE35 yo
DATE OF BIRTHMay 1909 – Marquette County, MICHIGAN
STATEMICHIGAN
FAMILYParent: Richard M & Charlotte Young SMITH
RANKPFC
FONCTIONInfantry
JOB before ENLISTEMENTDriver (steam engine)MI
DATE of ENLISTEMENT 
REGIMENT314th Infantry Regiment
DIVISION79th Infantry Division
DATE OF DEATH10 july 1944smith roy j tombe
STATUSKIA
PLACE OF DEATHVicinity of La Haye du Puits
CEMETERY TEMPORARY

TEMPORARY CEMETERY of Blosville N°3508

st james

PlotRowGraveD.D. Number
L17-


 See history of temporary cemeteries

CEMETERYNORMANDY AMERICAN CEMETERY from Colleville

Map Normandy American Cemetery

GRAVE
PlotRowGrave
D2412
DECORATION
Purple HeartPhoto FDLM
us army     div 79     314ri
 

314th INFANTRY  REGIMENT

Honors & Decorations

Individual Decorations  
Congressional Medal of Honor 2
Distinguished Service Cross; 3
Silver Star 282
Bronze Star 757
Legion of Honor in Grade of Chevalier (French) 1
Croix de Guerre with Palm (French) 4
Croix de Guerre with Silver Gilt Star (French) 4
Croix de Guerre with Silver Star (French); 1
Croix de Guerre with Bronze Star (French) 4
British Military Medal (Great Britain) 1
Source: Through Combat – 314th Infantry Regiment
Presidential Unit Citations
2nd Battalion Fort du Roule
1st Battalion La Haye Du Puits
3rd Battalion Meurthe River
Source: Department of the Army Pamphlet 672-1         -   July 1961
Meritorious Unit Commendation
Service Company 1 Jul 44 – 31 Dec 44
Source: Department of the Army Pamphlet 672-1 - July 1961
Campaigns
Normandy 6 Jun 44 – 24 Jul 44
Northern France 25 Jul 44 – 14 Sep 44
Rhineland 15 Sep 44 – 21 Mar 45
Ardennes-Alsace 16 Dec 44 – 25 Jan 45
Central Europe 22 Mar 45 – 11 May 45
Source: Department of the Army Pamphlet 672-1 - July 1961
Occupation Credit
Germany 20 May – 31 Oct 45
Source: Department of the Army Pamphlet 672-1, July 1961
 
Foreign Unit Awards (Awarded to all units of the 79th Division)
Attributions de parts étrangères (décerné à toutes les unités de la 79e Division)
French Croix De Guerre with Palm, awarded under Decision No. 3864, 28 April 1947, by the President of the Provisional Governement of the French Republic, with the following citation:
A remarkable unit which displayed splendid endurance and exceptional fighting zeal. It distinguished itself brilliantly from 21 to 24 November 1944 in hard combat. It mopped up in the forest of Parroy and materially aided the 2d Armored French Division to break through to the Col de Saverne. In spite of heavy losses, it fought stubbornly against a dashing and fanatical enemy, preventing it from reappearing in the Vosges. It thus contributed greatly to the liberation of Baccaret, Phalsbourg, and Saverne.
French Croix De Guerre with Palm, awarded under Decision No. 5, 14 January 1949, by the Minister of National Defense, with the following citation:
Splendid unit that incited by savage vigor, landed in Normandy in June 1944. Covered itself with glory in the battles of Saint-Lo and at Haye-du-Puits. Participated in the capture of Fougeres, Laval, and Le Mans, then crossing the Seine at Mantes-Gassicourt, on 19 August 1944, inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy before marching triumphantly into Paris on 27 August 1944. By its bold action, contributed largely to the success of the Allied armies and the liberation of Paris.
French Fourragere in the colors of the Croix de Guerre (1939-1945), awarded under Decision No. 48, 16 August 1949, by the Minister of National Defense.
Source: Department of the Army General Order 43 1950

CHERBOURG: The Star and Stripes flew over the Fort du Roule, a June 25, 2015

roule ceremonie 71

Photos: P. Dalibard ( Club Souvenir Militaire )

On June 25, 2015, at 10 a.m., members of the organization Nord Cotentin Mémoire 44, who came by jeeps and GMC, and all in period dress, paid tribute to the liberators by raising the coours on top of the Roule.

« A symbolic gesture to pay tribute to the American soldiers from the 79th Infantry Division who gallantly fought to take the fort. »

« The American flag flew over the Roule mountain, June 25, 1944, before even being on the front of the City Hall. It was important for us to remember today. The municipality allowed us to raise the Stars and Stripes for hours. It is an honor for all of us. »

Norbert, Régisseur du musée de la libération

Historic reminder

June 1944. While the British’s goal is « the Caen’ hinge », the Americans fight in Cotentin. Their goal is to take the Cherbourg harbour. The Roule Fortress was the last obstacle before taking Cherbourg, essential to deliver supplies to the Allied landed troops. Despite an intense aerial bombardment, the German opposition was a stubborn one, due to the Fort’s strategic position. The honor of his clearance, accomplished on June 25, will go to the 313rd and 314th Infantry Regiments of the 79th Infantry Division, this American Division, at the end of 36 hours of fights which end with grenades and cold weapons.

The permanent liberation of Cherbourg is confirmed on the next day, in the morning, making of the city the first harbour liberated in France. After a month of repairs by the American and French Engineers, the harbour, completely demolished by the Germans and the bombardments, welcome the first Liberty ships. Cherbourg, bridgehead for the Allied trops in France, became for a while, the world first harbour, ahead of New York, with 25 000 tons of material unloaded every day !

Ludovic AMELINE "La presse de la manche"

 

La 79th Infantry Division

Order of Battle

Chief Executive : Major General Ira T. Wyche
Adjoint : Brigadier General Edmund B. Sebree
Chief of Staff : Lieutenant-Colonel Maddrey A. Solomon puis le Colonel Maddrey A. Solomon à compter du 20 juin 1944
 
313rd Infantry Regiment Colonel Sterling A. Wood
1/313
2/313
3/313
314th Infantry Regiment Colonel Warren A. Robinson
1/314
2/314
3/314
315th Infantry Regiment Colonel Porter B. Wiggins, remplacé le 23 juin 1944 par le Colonel Bernard B. McMahon puis par le Colonel Robert H. York à compter du 13 juillet 1944, puis par le Lieutenant-Colonel John A. McAleer le 29 juillet 1944
1/331
2/331 : Lieutenant-Colonel James F. Faber (tué le 9 juillet 1944)
3/331
79th Reconnaissance Troop (mechanized)
304th Combat Engineer Battalion
304th Medical Battalion
79th Artillery Division 310th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm Howitzer)
311st Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm Howitzer)
312nd Field Artillery Battalion (155 mm Howitzer)
904th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm Howitzer)
779th Ordnance Light Maintenance Company
79th Quartermaster Company
79th Signal Company
Military Police Platoon
Headquarters Company
Band
 
REINFORCEMENTS
Anti-aircraft artillery 463th AAA AW Bn (Mbl), du 1er juillet 1944 au 9 juillet 1945
Cavalerie 749th Tank Battalion (749th Tk Bn), du 1er au 24 juillet 1944
Co B, 749th Tk Bn, du 31 juillet au 1er août 1944
Anti-tank fight 813rd TD Bn (SP), du 1er juillet au 9 septembre 1944
 
IMPORTANT DATES
ACTIVATED 15 Juin 1942 à Camp Pickett, Virginia
OVERSEAS 7 Avril 1944
CAMPAIGNS Normandie, Nord de la France, Allemagne, Europe Centrale
RETURNED to US 10 Decembre 1945
INACTIVATED 20 Decembre 1945
 
DAYS OF COMBAT 248
 
AWARDS
Distinguished Unit Citations 8 Distinguished Service Cross 13
Distinguished Service Medal 1 Silver Star 962
Legion of Merit 11 Soldier's Medal 27
Bronze Star 4 916 Air Medal 78

La 79th Infantry Division was raised in August 1917.

It was sent to France, arriving in July 1918.

In September, il took part in the Meuse-Argonne offensive.

Back in the United States in May-June 1919, it was demobilized shortly afterwards.


The division was brought back into active service on June 15th 1942. Assigned to VI Corps at Camp Pickett (Virginia).it remained in that sector until August 1942. In April 1944, the 79th Infantry Division left the United States for the UK where it continued training.

The Division landed on Utah Beach from June 12-14th 1944. Starting on June 18th, it took part with VII Corps in the attack on Cherbourg. Starting out from a Golleville-Urville line, it was stopped south-west of Valognes on June 19th. On June 20th, it resumed its advance, reching Brix and St Martin le Greard, and mopped up the area west of Valognes.

On the21st, it was reorganized prior to the attack on Cherbourg, and captured it on the evening of June 25th. On June 26th, it linked up with elements of the 4th Infantry Division arriving from the east.


corwin roule

corwin roule1

Between June 6th and June 30th, the division lost 2,376 men killed, wounded or missing.

monument la haye du puits
The memorial stone for the 79 th Infantry Division, Cherbourg road to La Haye du Puits, the only one in Europe dedicated to this army.

Allocated to VIII Corps, from July 3rd the 79th Infantry Division took part in the offensive on La Haye du Puits, Portbail Lessay and the Ay valley.

Still with VIII Corps, the division took part in Operation "Cobra". It took Lessay on July 26th. It advanced towards the Seine, reaching Dreux.

The division will continue its forward march through France and then Belgium, Holland and Germany in May 1944

route du 79th

The 79th Infantry Division was among the American Units committed most often during the Second World War. In the course of its advance through France and Germany, it lost 20,000 men, including 2,000 killed.

The germans described this division as one of the most "combative in the American Army".

The division was disbanded shortly after its return to the United States in December 1945.

TRANSLATION BYNathalie & Patrick

INFORMATION SOURCESPhil JACKSON
PICTURE SOURCEPhil JACKSON - Marie & Renaud
PROGRAMMERFrédéric & Renaud