Harold G JOBE

 

jobe harold g
ARMY SERIAL NUMBER19099132
AGE22 yo
DATE OF BIRTH1922
STATECALIFORNIA
FAMILYSingle
RANKCorporal
FONCTIONInfantry
JOB before ENLISTEMENTActors and actressesCALIFORNIA
DATE of ENLISTEMENT3 june 1942 Los Angeles CALIFORNIA
REGIMENT47th Infantry Regiment
DIVISION9th Infantry Division
DATE OF DEATH4 august 1944jobe harold g tombe
STATUSKIA
PLACE OF DEATHSt Lo
CEMETERY TEMPORARY 
 
CEMETERY BRITTANY AMERICAN CEMETERY de St James

Map St James American Cemetery

PlotRowGrave
I13
DECORATION
Good Conduct MedalGood Medal Conduite
Purple HeartPhoto FDLM
American Campaign Medalamerican campaign medal
European African Middle Eastern CampaingEAMECampaign
World War II Victory Medalvictory medal

 

us army div 9 div 9 1 47ir
STORY
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Memorial Glen

In the closing months of World War II, a grieving father resolved to create a place of peaceful repose dedicated to the memory of his son who had died defending freedom in Europe. This father's labor of love lives on today at Covina's "Parque Xalapa." Charles Jobe and his wife Betty were citrus growers in the hills east of Covina.

They were the proud parents of two sons: Harold Glen (left, b.1922) and Claude (b.1929), and it was Harold who lost his life at Saint-Lô, France, during the last days of the Battle of Normandy ("Operation Overlord") in August, 1944. A small, wooded creek ran through the Jobes's land on Holt Avenue, and it was in this mixed stand of live oaks and orange trees that Charles Jobe created "Memorial Glen." Near the center of the grove, in the shade of a magnificent 400-year-old live oak, Mr. Jobe set up a stone monument with a bronze plaque dedicating the park to his fallen son and to the other servicemen from Covina who had sacrificed their lives in World War II.

Over the next two decades, the Jobes hosted multitudes of visitors to Memorial Glen. Sadly, after Charles Jobe died in 1967, and his widow had to relocate elsewhere, the park became the haunt of youths who used the secluded spot for, well, let's just say less-than-reverential purposes. During this period of neglect, almost all of Mr. Jobe's labors were trashed by disrespectful vandals.

To make matters worse, when Interstate 10 was widened in the early 1970s, the adjacent service road was realigned to the east, and all of the trees in the western third of the former Jobe property were taken out. The removal of this protective canopy exposed the trunk and limbs of the ancient live oak to the sun's direct rays, and this resulted in the slow death of the veteran giant. Arborists tried their best to save it, but finally, in the early 1980s, what remained of the great tree had to be removed.

By this time, the City of Covina had acquired the land, and its Parks & Recreation Department created Parque Xalapa, named after Covina's sister-city in Mexico. In 1998, part of the park was turned into a formal Veterans Memorial. This interpretive monument was erected on the site...

...and a new commemorative plaque was installed to replace the long-vanished original.

Photo "Mémorial Glen"

jobe harold g memoire1

IN MEMORY
OF
CORPORAL Harold G. JOBE
KILLED IN ACTION AUGUST 4, 1944
NEAR St Lo FRANCE
"HAROLD GAVE HIS LIFE RATHER THAN RISK THE LIVES OF HIS MEN. HIS BRAVERY MAY NEVER BE BROADCAST TO THE WORLD, BUT HE WILL LIVE FOREVER IN THE HEARTS OF THOSE WHO KNEW HIM."

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SOURCE INFORMATION & PHOTOMonty Mc DANIEL - Clive TIRLEMONT - Aad.archives.gov - Yannick LONGY - Frédéric LAVERNHE
PROGRAMMERFrédéric & Renaud