Charles Robert MILLIRON

 

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Source : 116thregimentrollofhonor.blogspot.com

NUMBER OF SERVICE20364248
AGE25 yo
DATE OF BIRTH4 February 1919 Salem, Salem City, VIRGINIA
ETATRoanoke VIRGINIA
FAMILYSingle
RANKPrivate First Class
FONCTIONInfantryMan
JOB BEFORE ENLISTEMENTSemiskilled drillers, extraction of minerals and constructionNE
DATE of ENLISTEMENT3 February 1941 Roanoke VIRGINIA
COMPANYCompany D
REGIMENT 116th Infantry Regiment
DIVISION 29th Infantry Division
DATE OF DEATH6 June 1944

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Source : Frogman

STATUSKIA
PLACE OF DEATHOmaha Beach
DATA PLAN

omaha decoupage plage

Landing on Omaha Beach

CEMETERY TEMPORARY

CEMTERY TEMPORARY of Ruquet

blosville

 CEMTERY TEMPORARY of  Saint Laurent N°3505

blosville

Story of Cemetery Temporary

CEMETERYNORMANDY AMERICAN CEMETERY of Colleville

Map of Normandy American Cemetery

GRAVE
PlotRowGrave
I1020
DECORATION

Purple Heart

World War II Victory Medal 

Combat Infantryman Badge


Photo FDLM

victory medal

combat infantryman badge

 

 

us army div 29 116ri 116th Infantry coa
STORY
 

PFC Charles Robert MILLIRON was born 4 Feb 1919 in Roanoke, Virginia.

He was the 2nd of 6 children born to George Dillard and Nettie May (Howell) MILLIRON.

His father worked a variety of jobs and in 1940 Charles was working for the Works Projects Administration (W.P.A.) on road construction.

It is likely that Charles, like many other young men, had enlisted in his local National Guard unit for the $1 a day it paid for drilling every Tuesday night and for 2 weeks every summer. Charles was federalized in February 1941 with his unit, D Company 116th Infantry.

He trained with the unit at Fort Meade, Maryland and Camp Blanding, Florida before shipping out for England in September 1942.

Once in England he continued to train with the unit, now for the planned amphibious landing that would be part of the invasion of northern occupied France.

That landing took place on 6 Jun 1944 and PFC MILLIRON was killed in action on that day.

PFC MILLIRON rests forever in the Normandy American Cemetery.

Brother, Alfred Wiley MILLIRON, served in the U.S. Army.

Great-grandfather, Alexander Blueford MILLIRON, was a PVT in the Bedford Light Artillery, and died of wounds in Richmond, VA in 1864.  

div 29

29th INFANTRY DIVISION - BLUE AND GRAY

 

Activated/Activé

 Normandy/Normandie

3 Feb 1941  Days of Combat/Jour de Combat  242
   Casualties/Victimes 20 620

Entered Combat/Entré au combat

 
6 Jun1944 D-Day  

Commanding Generals/Commandants généraux

Maj. Gen. Milton A. Reckord (Feb 41 - Jan 42)
Maj. Gen. Leonard T. Gerow (Feb 42 - Jul 43)
Maj. Gen. Charles H. Gerhardt (Jul 43 - inactivation)

Campaigns/Campagnes

Normandy (6 Jun 44 - 24 Jul 44)
Northern France (25 Jul 44 - 14 Sep 44)
Rhineland (15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45)
Central Europe (22 Mar 45 - 11 May 45)

   

PLAN DE ROUTE DE LA CAMPAGNE - CAMPAIGN ROUTE MAP

carte campagne europe

DIVISION CHRONICLE


The 29th Infantry Division trained in Scotland and England for the crosschannel invasion, October 1942-June 1944. Teamed with the 1st Division, a regiment of the 29th (116th Infantry) was in the first assault wave to hit the beaches at Normandy on D-day, 6 June 1944. Landing on Omaha Beach on the same day in the face of intense enemy fire, the Division soon secured the bluff tops and occupied Isigny, 9 June. The Division cut across the Elle River and advanced slowly toward St. Lo, fighting bitterly in the Normandy hedge rows. After taking St. Lo, 18 July 1944, the Division joined in the battle for Vire, capturing that strongly held city, 7 August. Turning west, the 29th took part in the assault on Brest, 25 August-18 September 1944. After a short rest, the Division moved to defensive positions along the Teveren-Geilenkirchen line in Germany and maintained those positions through October. (In mid-October the 116th Infantry took part in the fighting at the Aachen Gap.) On 16 November the Division began its drive to the Roer, blasting its way through Siersdorf, Setterich, Durboslar, and Bettendorf, and reaching the Roer by the end of the month. Heavy fighting reduced Julich Sportplatz and the Hasenfeld Gut, 8 December. From 8 December 1944 to 23 February 1945, the Division held defensive positions along the Roer and prepared for the offensive. The attack jumped off across the Roer, 23 February, and carried the Division through Julich, Broich, Immerath, and Titz, to Munchen-Gladbach, 1 March 1945. The Division was out of combat in March. In early April the 116th Infantry helped mop up in the Ruhr area. On 19 April 1945 the Division pushed to the Elbe and held defensive positions until 4 May. Meanwhile, the 175th Infantry cleared the Klotze Forest. After VE-day, the Division was on military government duty in the Bremen enclave.

CHRONIQUE DE DIVISION


La 29th Infantry Division s'entraîna en Ecosse et en Angleterre pour l'invasion crosschannel, d'octobre 1942 à juin 1944. En équipe avec la 1st Division, un régiment du 29th (116th Infantry) se trouvait dans la première vague d'assaut pour frapper les plages de Normandie. Le 6 juin 1944, débarquant à Omaha Beach, le même jour, face à un feu nourri de l'ennemi, la division s'empara bientôt des falaises et occupa Isigny, le 9 juin. La Division traversa la rivière Elle et s'avança lentement vers Saint-Lô, se battant amèrement dans les rangées de haies de Normandie. Après avoir pris St. Lo, le 18 juillet 1944, la division se joignit à la bataille de Vire pour s'emparer de cette ville fortement occupée, le 7 août. Tournant vers l'ouest, le 29 a pris part à l'assaut sur Brest, 25 août-18 septembre 1944. Après un court repos, la division a déménagé à des positions défensives le long de la ligne Teveren-Geilenkirchen en Allemagne et a maintenu ces positions jusqu'en octobre. (À la mi-octobre, le 116e régiment d'infanterie prit part aux combats à Aix-la-Chapelle.) Le 16 novembre, la division commença sa route vers la Roer, traversant Siersdorf, Setterich, Durboslar et Bettendorf, et atteignant la Roer par la fin du mois. Les combats intenses ont réduit Julich Sportplatz et le Hasenfeld Gut, le 8 décembre. Du 8 décembre 1944 au 23 février 1945, la division occupe des positions défensives le long de la Roer et se prépare à l'offensive. L'attaque a sauté à travers le Roer, le 23 février, et a porté la Division par l'intermédiaire de Julich, Broich, Immerath, et Titz, à Munchen-Gladbach, le 1er mars 1945. La Division était hors combat en mars. Au début du mois d'avril, le 116th Infantry a aidé à nettoyer la région de la Ruhr. Le 19 avril 1945, la division pousse vers l'Elbe et occupe des positions défensives jusqu'au 4 mai. Pendant ce temps, le 175th Infantry a dégagé la forêt de Klotze. Après le jour de la victoire, la division était en service militaire dans l'enclave de Brême.
SOURCE INFORMATION & PHOTOArmydivs.squarespace.com

SOURCE INFORMATION & SOURCE PHOTOAbmc.gov - Findagrave.com - Aad.archives.gov   - JF PELLOUAIS  
PROGRAMMERHenri, Garrett, Clive, Frédéric & Renaud
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